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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

John Conyers
U.S. Representative, D-Michigan, Judiciary Ranking Member
LINKTV 07/24/2013
Goodman: Could he be brought up on charges of perjury? Massie: If this were any American citizen or civilian, they would certainly be prosecuted for what he just did. At a minimum, he should lose his post. Goodman: do you agree with that, Congress member Conyers? Conyers: yes, ma'am, I do, completely.
John Conyers
U.S. Representative, D-Michigan, Judiciary Ranking Member
LINKTV 07/24/2013
Goodman: (Clapper) himself admitted that he did not tell the truth. Conyers: I think we are now at the point of having a more honest disclosure of what is going on in our intelligence community, which we now find was very deliberately ignoring parts of the law that they knew perfectly well they were violating.
John Conyers
U.S. Representative, Judiciary Ranking Member
LINKTV 08/02/2013
Goodman: Do you think NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden did the right thing? Conyers: Well, i think he was overzealous and probably didn't -- he has clearly broken some laws for which they now, the government wants to prosecute him for, but inadvertently, he’s revealed to us a whole area of secrecy
John Conyers
U.S. Representative, Judiciary Ranking Member
LINKTV 08/02/2013
Goodman: defeat this and yet, it was so close (Amash amendment in the House). Conyers: it was seven votes would have made the difference. To be honest, we did not know we were that close to victory. Out a "dear colleague" letters urging that the amendment be supported and they were panicked by it. It was a signal that even in
Thomas Massie
U.S. Representative, R-Kentucy, co-sponsor Amash Amendment
LINKTV 08/02/2013
Massie continued: lying to Congress. He could have chosen other words to say. He could've said, "i can't comment on that." Instead he chose to lie to us in a hearing. Goodman: Could he be brought up on charges of perjury? Massie: if this were any American citizen or civilian, they would certainly be prosecuted for what he just did. At a minimum, he should lose his post. Goodman: do you agree with that, Congress member Conyers? Conyers: yes, ma'am, I do, completely
Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
LINKTV 01/30/2014
Goodman: Snowden's latest disclosures, the Huffington Post reports the NSA spied on foreign governments before and during the 2009 U.N., Climate Summit in Copenhagen. An internal NSA document says it's analysts and foreign partners briefed U.S. Negotiators on other countries preparations and goals, saying -- "signals intelligence will undoubtedly play a significant role in keeping our negotiators as well informed as possible throughout the two-week event. The NSA has declined to comment on these latest revelations. The 2009 Copenhagen summit ended in failure.
Eric Holder
U.S. Attorney General
LINKTV 01/30/2014
Goodman: Also testifying in Wednesdays hearing, Attorney General Eric Holder said he believes the bulk collection of phone records is constitutional but will be reformed on the orders of President Obama. Holder: I would say 15 judges in the FISA court, to judges, one in California and one in New York, have looked at this question and a determination that the 215 program is in fact constitutional. One judge in Washington, D.C. has decided it is not. But I think it only deals with half of the question. I believe they are correct that it is constitutional, it is an appropriate use, in a Constitutional sense of the government’s power. But the question is –and what the President has posed to us, just because we can do something, should we do it?
Edward Snowden
Whistleblower
LINKTV 02/10/2014
Goodman: U.S. intelligence officials are claiming Edward Snowden stole internal NSA documents by using cheap and widely available software that still went mostly undetected. Speaking to "The New York Times," investigators looking into Snowden’s case, say he deployed a simple web crawler that automatically downloaded some 1.7 million files. In a statement, Snowden responded “It’s ironic that officials are giving classified information to journalists in an effort to discredit me for giving classified information to journalists. The difference is that I did so to inform the public about the government’s actions, and they’re doing so to misinform the public about mine,” he said.
Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
LINKTV 02/19/2014
Goodman: A court in Britain has ruled police acted legally when they detained the partner of journalist Glenn Greenwald at Heathrow airport in London under an anti-terrorism law. David Miranda was carrying documents leaked by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden when he was detained for nearly nine hours. While acknowledging the detention marked "an indirect interference with press freedom," the court upheld its legality.
Glenn Greenwald (quoted)
Co-Founder The Intercept
LINKTV 02/19/2014
Goodman: The ruling comes just days after Greenwald and three other journalists won the George Polk Award one of journalism’s highest honors, for the reporting on the NSA. Greenwald said the court ruling makes it clear the top British spy agency was monitoring "the communications of myself, David, and/or the Guardian." He wrote, “It may be perfectly normal for a country lacking constitutional guarantees of press freedom (such as the U.K.) to have their surveillance agencies eavesdrop on the communications of journalists and their family members, but that conduct by itself it is rather radical” Greenwald said.
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